This week the Public Art Challenge is hosted by Marsha – I should have been posting this yesterday but I’m playing catch-up. Still, hopefully I’ll be back on my Monday schedule for next week šŸ™‚

Lets start with a piece of mystery art – I found this posted on a bridge close to home…

…Made of 25 individual sheets of A4 paper forming a mosaic of an image of people shouting, or screaming maybe? Who it’s by or the why behind it, I have no idea but it makes a change from the usual grafitti šŸ™‚

A more official art piece in the form of the Middlesex County crest which once adorned the brickwork in the centre of the bridge before the North Circular Road was widened…

…Now it is mounted at one end of the concrete wall and the one from the other side of the road is fitted to the opposite end of the wall (The path on the other side disappeared as part of the road widening). It should be natural bronze but grafitti lends it some colour.

I showed one of Sean Henry’s works a couple of weeks back and promised I would show another one. Simply titled Seated Man, 2011…

…Human interaction gives some scale to the figure.

Here’s another seated man…

…A sculpture of ‘Spike’ Milligan – Actor, Comedian and Author (and probably a lot more besides!). Crafted by local sculptor John Somerville and installed in the gardens of Stephens House by The Finchley Society. The work is titled ‘A Conversation with Spike’ – you are encouraged to “Take a seat for a quiet chat with our local comic genius.”

A day later and also with slightly different content than planned (It rained heavily yesterday so I didn’t do my intended walk). So, for this week’s PPAC I’ve got an example of modern Shona Sculpture from Chapungu Sculpture Park in Harare…

…The Shona people have a tradition of working in stone with the human face often forming a key part of the artwork.

Now something closer to home – about 400yds away! It’s graffiti – but not a very colourful form. Instead, it has something to say…

…The spraycan writing is as bad as my handwriting – which is why I use a keyboard šŸ˜‰ But I believe this transcribes as “Everyone has a chapter they don’t read out loud..” Makes a change from the usual ‘tag’ graffiti and it’s quite thought provoking too šŸ™‚

Back to Sculpture. Here’s a Horse Tamer from Piazza del Quirinale in Rome…

…It is one of a pair in the centre of the square that are believed to represent Castor and Pollux, the Dioscuri. I’m afraid I can’t tell you which one this is! The sculptures are thought to date to the 3rd century AD. You can read more here.

I have another artform to show, but as that will be stretching the guidelines a bit too far, I’m going to show it in a supplemental post šŸ™‚

The third week of the Photographing Public Art Challenge and this week Marsha is hosting. If you pop over to her blog you can read a fascinating post about the Prescott Petroglyphs šŸ™‚

I’m going to start off by bending the rules a little – well, the guidelines at least. “The art should be visible from streets, sidewalks or outdoor public places.” – is fine and dandy but I think there are some indoor public places that will be missed if we stick strictly to that. For example, many churches have wonderful art and are open to the public for prayer and just to visit. So I’m starting this week with a stained-glass window…

…This is the west window of St Thomas of Canterbury, the parish church of Northaw. The church is dedicated to St. Thomas a Beckett, and was built in 1882. The windows were added between 1886 and 1897 and were the work of Ward and Hughes. The west window bears the dedication ‘To the glory of God a memorial to Queen Victoria’s Jubilee’ – it depicts the life of Joseph.

Talking of Queen Victoria – here’s a statue of her that adorns the Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace…

Here’s a small Mosiac in an underpass outside Waterloo station in London. It directs pedestrians to the bus station but can you tell me what’s wrong with the bus as depicted? (no ‘bus-spotter’ knowledge needed)…

To finish this week, here is a sculpture by the artist Sean Henry…

…called Woman (Being Looked At), it was part of a mini exhibition in The Economist Plaza back in 2012. The statue is made of bronze and cor-ten steel, coloured with all-weather paint.

That’s my selection for this week, gleaned from my back catalogue. Hopefully I’ll have some fresh shots next week šŸ™‚