More likely to be found on the motorway taking passengers from city to city, here is a historic shot showing a coach in an unusual environment. The image was taken in 1981 on a rail enthusiasts trip around the various depots and freight yards of Manchester. This is close to Miles Platting and Cheetham Hill. Behind the coach and are the buildings of the H Marcel Guest paint works. They are grouped on either bank of the River Irk which cuts deep into the land here – you can see a bridge connecting both sides of the factory on the right of shot just above the rear of the coach. The grassy embankment in the distance was the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway’s Prestwich line which was closed and the tracks lifted by the time this photo was taken. The embankment is now back in transport use as the Cheetham Hill depot for Manchester Metrolink Trams. The coach is a Leyland Leopard with Alexander Y Type body. Colour slide converted to digital B&W…

In its natural environment, here is a Fiat bus – a 418 with Breda bodywork I think. In service with ATAF on the streets of Florence, the type dates back to 1971 and was being phased out when this photo was taken in 1995. Colour print digitised and converted to B&W…

Long after the rush-hour, below the city streets, a Class 313 electric unit waits in Moorgate station for departure time. The train will form a service to Hertford North. Over 40 years old now, the 313’s are finally being phased out of service on the Great Northern routes and being replaced by new Class 717 units. Some may find further service elsewhere like a number of sister units that have been refurbished for duties along the coast lines around the Brighton area. This digital image was taken in 2010 and converted to B&W…

Catch up with Cee’s B&W Challenge Here.

I have used many different frames in the past. Signal gantries and bridges are a favourite ploy with railway images. Here are three, more ‘architectural’, shots for Nancy’s Challenge – though there is a railway connection in the first 😉

A gateway to Europe – Estació de França, Barcelona…

Steps into Fort Belvedere, Florence…

Carrer de la Volta dels Tamborets, Barcelona…

For Nancy’s challenge this week I’ve chosen a scientific instrument from the Museo Galileo in Florence… The museum catalogue for this item reads: –
“This square-shaped instrument, made by Christoph Schissler, was used to measure time, distances, and heights. Calibrated for latitude 48°15′ (corresponding to Augsburg). There are, in fact, two horary quadrants, one with curved lines for unequal hours, the other with straight lines. Two adjacent sides carry the shadow square with several graduations. The opposite corner holds a pivoting vane fitted with viewer. The quadrant is fixed to a wooden stand, whose parts telescope to allow the instrument to be placed in its gold-tooled black leather box. Brought to Florence from Germany by Prince Mattias de’ Medici in the first half of the seventeenth century.” It was made in 1599.