Cee is in charge of this week’s Photographing Public Art Challenge and there is a nice selection of subjects in her post 🙂

This week I’m going inside for a visit to Bath Abbey. Lets start with a couple of oft overlooked items. Here is the carved detail on the end of a choir pew…

…It’s wood darkened by centuries of caresses by choristers fingers 🙂

Sometimes made of wood but more commonly of gilded metal, the Lectern…

…often resembles an Eagle – its spread wings carrying the word of God. I sometimes wonder if a Dove might be a more appropriate symbol?

There are many memorials mounted around the walls of the Abbey. Here is a detail of one dedicated to Sir Richard Bickerton…

…The design recalling his lifetime as a Naval Officer. One incident from his career that may be of interest – In October 1776 he took command of the 74-gun third rate ship Terrible; while aboard that vessel he captured the American privateer Rising States on 15 April 1777 while cruising off Ushant.

There are many stained-glass windows around the Abbey. This one, installed in 1949, recalls the crowning of Eadgar – 1st King of all England – in the Saxon monastery on the site of the Abbey…

…Although he became King in 959, the coronation did not take place until 973. It was planned by Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury and advisor to the King. The format has become the basis of our current coronation ceremonies.

Hope you enjoyed my selection 🙂

Running very late with everything after a busy few days. Meant to post my entry for Cee’s Midweek Madness Challenge last Friday!

Here we go with Brown Bag and Shoes…

…Commuters waiting on Kentish Town station.

Khaki uniform…

…Wikipedia assures me it’s brown with a tinge of yellow 😉

And finally we have wood…

…Stained with varnish and age 🙂

A day later and also with slightly different content than planned (It rained heavily yesterday so I didn’t do my intended walk). So, for this week’s PPAC I’ve got an example of modern Shona Sculpture from Chapungu Sculpture Park in Harare…

…The Shona people have a tradition of working in stone with the human face often forming a key part of the artwork.

Now something closer to home – about 400yds away! It’s graffiti – but not a very colourful form. Instead, it has something to say…

…The spraycan writing is as bad as my handwriting – which is why I use a keyboard 😉 But I believe this transcribes as “Everyone has a chapter they don’t read out loud..” Makes a change from the usual ‘tag’ graffiti and it’s quite thought provoking too 🙂

Back to Sculpture. Here’s a Horse Tamer from Piazza del Quirinale in Rome…

…It is one of a pair in the centre of the square that are believed to represent Castor and Pollux, the Dioscuri. I’m afraid I can’t tell you which one this is! The sculptures are thought to date to the 3rd century AD. You can read more here.

I have another artform to show, but as that will be stretching the guidelines a bit too far, I’m going to show it in a supplemental post 🙂