In my last post from the farm, I was heading up to my freshly purchased field with an equally new Claas harvester.  So now I’ll tell you about the harvesting of the barley crop we bought with the field.

I hauled the header up the lane behind the harvester but, as mentioned in the first post, things are tight around entrances to fields.  So, at the entrance I uncoupled the header trailer and then reversed the Tucano into a handy track.  The tractor was then brought up from the farm with the trailer which was the uncoupled in the lane.  I could then use the tractor to move the header to a more suitable position for the harvester to hook up……Here we are hooked up and ready at the entrance to the field to make a start on harvesting……The first task is to create an open area on this side of the field so that the tractor and trailer can drive in ready for when the harvester is full. Looking at an aerial image on google maps, it seems this is exactly what the real life farmer does too! Here’s our beach-head with the tractor on the land ready to unload the harvester…

After the initial clearing cut, I can then proceed around the field in any way I like. The crop will produce around 2.5 trailer loads of barley. It’s a good idea to keep an eye on the prices that the various businesses in game will pay for my barley as these vary over time. Here’s a screen that shows the various crop types in game and their symbols……and here’s the current prices……You can see that the best payment for barley is £559 but Willow Brook Stores’ offer is going up – neither represents a good return. With ample silo space on the farm, I can choose to store the crop and wait for the offer to improve and that is what I am going to do. Here’s the Arion dropping off a load at the farm silos……By the time I finished the harvesting the price was up to £615 and still climbing, so I’m going to wait some more 🙂

Here’s the last load going into the trailer……and then we can decouple the header and tow it back down to the farm……where the harvester can be parked up in the large shed…

In future harvesting operations I hope to have a second smaller tractor that will tow the header to and from the fields. I will be talking about buying that tractor, getting our Chickens and some of my other plans in the next post. In the meantime we’re left with a field full of straw that needs lime and to be ploughed before I can plant another crop.

This is the first of my new Farming Simulator 19 series which, like Trucking Digest and Birdshot, will appear as and when 😉 Let me begin by saying that the farm that you saw images from in my last ‘Save Slot post has since been consigned to the recycle bin along with a couple of other early farms during my discovery period in this game. I learnt a lot from it and have started a bit differently this time – you’ll notice an absense of farmhouse in my shots from the current farm for example. Further down the series I’ll explain some of my starting decisions born out my early experiences. For now, I think we’ll take a look at a fairly typical day on Mill Valley Farm which comprises of fields 21 and 22 on this map…

Very early morning and it’s tipping down with rain – any plans on making an early start with harvesting are put on hold. Instead I make an early run to the farmers store for some essential supplies. We got Fertilizer, Seeds and Herbicide…

I need the herbicide to kill off some weeds growing in a crop of Barley which was in one of the fields I bought. At least weed-killing and fertilizing can be done in the wet…

Then it’s time to tidy away the machinery before breakfast – a place for everything and everything some place of the other 😉 At least the rain seems to have almost stopped…

With the sun drying the crops rapidly, we’re off to do some harvesting for neighbouring farms which earns us a payment for our time and the wear and tear on our machinery. We also get a share of the money from the crop – so it’s in our interest to make sure we don’t miss any. This is the first field and you can see what happens if you don’t deal with the weeds – it may be pretty but that crop of oats is going to be around 20% down on what it could have been…

These fields are larger than mine so it takes several runs with my trailer to deliver the harvested grains to the selling point…

On to the second field where the farmer has taken really good care of his Barley crop. I think that took 7 runs to the grain elevator before the job was complete. You really don’t want to be walking behind a Combine Harvester! …

Back to my own farm where I find that my newly sown Oat crop is growing nicely. I’ll have to prepare the other field by ploughing and adding lime in preparation for my other crop which I think will be Canola…

End of the day and it’s time to wash all the mud and dust off the equipment – we all like a shower after a long day’s work don’t we 🙂

More details about equipment and other choices in the next post.

Here we go with a quick look at a game that I’ve recently started playing – Farming Simulator 19. There is a bit of previous with this title. 3 years back I bought the 2017 version of the game. I did a few hours in it but in many ways it just couldn’t hold my attention. Looking back, I think this was because of the starting set-up which in normal difficulty mode gave you a farm with much of its infrastructure and machinery in place. The idea was to farm your 3 fields and do work for other farmers in the area so that you could ultimately expand your farm by gradually taking over the other fields on the map. But you were stuck with machinery that was already a maintenance costs liability and you might not have really wanted to do the type of farming dictated by the machinery anyway!

FS19 changes all that. The normal difficulty mode has changed name to Farm Manager – but that’s not telling the story at all. Now you start with nothing but €1250000. It’s up to you to choose what land you buy and what equipment you buy. And that means you can choose from the start what type of farmer you want to be. The game starts by placing you in the bottom rh corner of the map. There is a nice set of 3 fields there which the dev’s seem to be offering as a good place to build your farm. But, like in most games, it’s best to look at the other options before making your land purchases. One issue with the fields in that ‘suggested’ area is that they already have crops – two of those crops require more specialised equipment so you’d be spending a lot of money on diverse equipment right at the start if you want to make the money from those crops. I chose 2 medium sized fields elsewhere that also had crops but Barley and Wheat are common crops and you only need one type of Harvester to benefit from these.

And that’s how I started the game. After buying the land, you build a farmhoue assuming you want one, and probably a shed for your machines to live in – it’s up to you how you spend that starting money! And that flexibility is why I’m enjoying this most recent version of the game. Here’s some shots of life on my farm…




Crops harvested – it’s time to decide what the next crop should be and whether to get into livestock of some sort. I think this game may need its own posts like Trucking Digest and Birdshot – now I need to think up a title 🙂