A Photo a Week Challenge: Unexpected Windows

I thought long about this challenge from Nancy. I don’t often stumble upon ‘unexpected’ images. However, there is this shot from our visit to Barcelona back in 2017. Taken through the locked gates of the Mercado de la Boqueria, the normally busy stalls are closed with only the pigeons for company…

Then I remembered this from back in 2009……This is a view through one of the wrecked turnstiles into the abandoned Claremont Road football ground, once home of Hendon FC. It tells a tale of falling attendance and the need for investment to maintain league position. There’s an old saying – Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. In modern non-league football that can be paraphrased to ‘Beware of Property Developers offering to help your club’. Hendon were ousted from their home and now groundshare with Edgware. The ground was demolished in 2012 if I remember correctly and is now a housing estate. Hendon were not the first, but hopefully will be one of the last to suffer this fate after a battle last season to save Dulwich Hamlet which saw them return home to their ground mid-season this year after questions were asked in Parliament and the local council stepped in to protect what is a community resource. A set of my shots of the dilapidated Claremont Road ground can be seen here.

Advertisements

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Places People Visit

Somewhat late entering this challenge but it gives me an excuse to use some of the images I took whilst on Holiday in the summer. In the UK we have lots of Preserved Railways and these are popular tourist attractions. On a very grey day we made our way from Auchterarder over to Bo’ness on the River Forth for a visit to the Bo’ness and Kinniel Railway. This is also the home of the Scottish Railway Preservation Society’s museum, so it’s well worth a visit 🙂 I had great fun demonstrating to a young lady how to pull a signal lever – Epi watched on with a sympathetic smile 😉 The star of the show on the day was Hunslet designed 0-6-0 saddle tank 68007. She’s wearing a false identity because although she is the same as a number of similar locomotives bought by the LNER that subsequently saw service with British Railways, she was bought by the War department and after the war went to work in the Ayrshire collieries of the National Coal Board as number 7. Bo’ness was the terminus of the Slamannan and Borrowstounness Railway which was absorbed into the North British Railway and subsequently the LNER. The line retains much of the unique character of the period of its construction and operation. The other end of the preserved line is Manuel Junction at which there was an accident in 1874 when a freight train was allowed to shunt across the path of an express bound for Perth – 16 people were killed – it was a typical railway accident of the period and ironically would not have happened if block signalling equipment being installed at the time had been in service. Finally, our train crew for the day deserves a second glance – in war torn Britain some Women drove trains but I’m not sure that hair would have been accepted back then 😉 Here’s the photos 🙂

Catch up with Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge Here.

Views from the A822

The A822 forms a relaxing and scenic alternative to the A9 if you’re travelling from Auchterarder to Dunkeld. Despite it being the height of the summer the traffic along the road on a weekday was very light though I needed to watch out for HGV’s and Coaches on the narrower sections. It passes through Sma’ Glen which is a popular stop off point beside the River Almond – here’s a shot I took seven years ago at Newton Bridge with Meall Reamhar standing bold against the skyline…

Moving on to photos taken this year. At the southern end of Sma’ Glen there is a parking area that I think the highways agency keep closing off and the locals keep re-opening as it gives beautiful views across the valley – from evidence on the ground it is a popular spot for young lovers 😉 This is a view of Dallick House from beside the A822. The foreground is populated by a Rowan tree, Heather and Rosebay Willowherb, which hide the River Almond in the valley below. The hills behind the house are Botich with Craig na Hash beyond…

Epi occasionally plays with a camera too – here she is not very well camouflaged in the bracken with Botich behind…

And this is the view that had captured her attention. Looking across the valley towards Stroness. The curve of the River Almond is marked by the trees in the left foreground though you won’t see the river itself. The van in the middle distance is on the B8063 heading towards Buchanty. If you open this photo in full view you can just make out some sheep grazing below Stroness – where there are remains of a Roman Fort……Where we are standing is close to the location of a Roman Signal station though there’s nothing to see here now. There is a very well preserved Roman Fort over at Braco which we visited on another day – to be posted about soon.

At the northern end of Sma’ Glen is the village of Amulree. Once again, there is a small layby which gives the opportunity to take a break and enjoy the view. This shot is looking across the valley of the River Braan, the path of which is marked by the heather and trees in the middle distance. Dalreoch Hill (left) and Creag Bhiorach (right) form the distant horizon…

And in this shot the houses of Amulree can be seen standing out in stark white against the summer greens and browns of the highlands. A pick-up drives south along the A822 on the right. The course of the River Braan passes in the dip beyond the field out of sight. On the extreme left of the photo the Ghirron Burn is just visible as it joins the Braan and its path can be traced across the photo to where it meanders behind the stand of trees in the middle distance. The distant horizon consists of Crom Chreag on the left and Glen Lochan with the steep slopes of Meall nam Fuaran glowing in the sunlight…

Top photo taken on Canon EOS 7D. Everything else taken on Fujifilm X100F.

Hope you enjoyed these scenic photos from Perthshire 🙂