Weekly Photo Challenge: Ready

Camp

In production since 1876, Camp Coffee was reputedly originally created to ease the making of Coffee on the battlefield.   This is the current label – the original one depicted the Sikh soldier delivering the drink on a tray to the Gordon Highlanders’ officer.  It was almost certainly changed to avoid accusations of racism.   The irony is that the orginal label may well have been true to life as the Gordon Highlanders and the Sikh Regiment within the British army shared several campaigns and it’s not inconceivable that the Officer may have had a Sikh batman – Who knows!  

Camp Coffee itself has a very bitter sweet taste and is probably best served as an iced drink in the summer rather than as hot coffee.   However, its principal use these days is in baking for coffee cake and coffee flavoured icing.   Fuller details of its history can be found on Wikipedia.  Since 1876 it has remained… Ready Aye Ready!

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64 Comments

    1. My normal morning ‘wake me up’ is Tea. Coffee is something I drink from time to time rather than every day – each to their own 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

  1. An interesting choice my friend 2e0mca
    and one that is said to add a tilt to the kilt,
    of course that could be just a rumour 🙂 lol

    Have a great rest of day now…

    Androgoth

  2. I like your choice for the photo challenge. I’m fascinated by product packaging and labeling. In the US packaging gets updated all the time. Most often the external change announces a change to the contents inside; such as lower fat, new fresh scent, etc., but as you pointed out sometimes the labeling is adapting to the changing customer perceptions. I remember was when the graphics on the Aunt Jemima pancake syrup label was updated. Early on the label featured a smiling fat black women wearing a bandanna on her head; a Mammy a la Gone with the Wind. Today, Aunt Jemaima has slimmed down considerably. She is well coifed (hair probably relaxed or it is a weave) and her accessory of choice are pearl button earrings. Oh yeah, she’s still smiling. 🙂

    1. A little bit of childhood memories – I still do drink it occasionally. If it’s as cold tonight as expected I think it could be a nice warmer tomorrow mid morning 🙂

  3. Ooh! I have to try now! Is it readily available in any of the franchise superstores like Sainsbury? I never paid attention to their coffee or related aisles since I usually collect a variety of coffee as I travel.

  4. Great entry and very nice photo Martin! Love the cool, vintage looking Camp label with the coffee cup in the background.

  5. I’m ready for some of that delicious, caffeine- loaded coffee cake….one huge slice please! That is one cool history and post my friend. In America, a lot of people like bitter coffee…the stronger the kick, the more it keeps us awake on long nights or days at work. Is that stronger than Red Bull drink? Best wishes to you and your family.

    1. I wouldn’t know it’s strength my friend but it is very bittersweet – I don’t know if it is available in America. Best wishes to you and yours 🙂

  6. I can’t start my day without a cup of coffee. So for me to get ready for the day, coffee is really essential. 🙂 Great post for this week’s challenge. A thoughtful one. 🙂

  7. I haven’t seen a bottle of chicory & coffee for many years. Mum used to buy it but a different brand. I don’t know if you can still get it here. Off track a bit but I recently bought a bottle of HP sauce which I really like. I hadn’t had it since I left the Navy 21 years ago. It was always present on the tables in the ship’s cafe.

  8. Oh, Wow! This is terrific! I never knew this existed, and I LOVE coffee. I don’t think I’d ever want to drink this as a regular beverage, because I’m one of these people who loves the aroma of fresh-brewed coffee almost as much as the taste. Without that aroma, it just wouldn’t be the same. But I’m very glad to know about this product. Thanks for the information.

    Oh … yeah … and your photo is good too.

    1. Thanks Cris – some of these challenges give me the chance to do a little still-life photography which hasn’t been a major part of my portfolio in the past.

      1. I can relate to that. I’ve never done any “real” still-life photography, like putting stuff on a table with white background, proper lighting, et al. The only still life I’ve done is an old barn here, an old horse-drawn plow, basically, things that don’t move—hence, still life. 🙂

        I’m still not sure where to go with this week’s challenge, as the stuff I shoot generally aren’t indulging in anything. One can hardly claim, for instance, the horses in my “Meal Time” photo, which are eating hay, as indulging. 🙂 So, I’ve still got a lot of thinking to do. I need to see more of the other entries. Maybe it will give me some ideas. Good luck.

      2. Indulge is not an easy one is it… Like sunsets… I think there will be a lot of repetition – we’ll see. As for white backgrounds and proper lighting… I’ve never done that – just natural / artificial light and whatever background I could come up – it’s fun to experiment 🙂

      3. Your last comment didn’t have a Reply, so this in reply to your last comment.

        The only ideas I have for indulge would be related to eating—in particular, desserts, and I don’t do a lot of those except at restaurants. What I can do are sunsets and sunrises. I have a couple of sunrises in my f-stop fantasy blog. Check them out and let me know what you think.
        https://fstopfantasy.wordpress.com/2012/01/28/weekly-photo-challenge-hope-rural-sunrise/
        https://fstopfantasy.wordpress.com/2012/01/03/country-sunrise/

      4. Hi Cris – firstly, I’m not sure I’m the best person to offer guidance. I’m very much a self taught photographer and I certainly don’t get it right every time if at all! 🙂

        I think the image has two main issues for me: –

        It doesn’t have a focal point as such, so the eye doesn’t really know where to look and winds up wandering the frame. The one thing which does catch the attention is the single fence post that sticks up into the orange of the sunrise.

        The second thing is the huge expanse of grey above the sunrise and the lens vignetting that is apparent in the corners.

        I can’t see what else was available to you when framing the shot so I can’t suggest an alternative initial choice of framing or focal length (I’m guessing this was a wide-angle shot). But I might have chosen to zoom in to maximise the distant treeline, cut out the fence posts and reduce the grey area of the sky.

        You could achieve something along those lines with a letterbox crop of the image – removing much of the foreground (certainly the paler area as that distracts) and the grey of the sky up to where the vignetting begins. Then perhaps remove some of the right hand side where there isn’t a lot happening in the sky anyway.

        Well, you did ask… Hope my thoughts are helpful 🙂

      5. Hey, thanks, I appreciate that. Yes, your thoughts are helpful . . . and I did ask. I don’t know what a letterbox crop is, though. I’ve copied off your comments and will take a looksee so I can put it all together.

        I guess the focus for me was the sunrise itself, but I can see your viewpoint as well. Thanks.

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